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A Mothers Secret - Atlantic

How sweet the sacred legend—if unblamed
  In my slight verse such holy things are named—
  Of Mary's secret hours of hidden joy,
  Silent, but pondering on her wondrous boy!
  Ave, Maria! Pardon, if I wrong
  Those heavenly words that shame my earthly song!

     The choral host had closed the angel's strain
  Sung to the midnight watch on Bethlehem's plain;
  And now the shepherds, hastening on their way,
  Sought the still hamlet where the Infant lay.
  They passed the fields that gleaning Ruth toiled o'er,—
  They saw afar the ruined threshing-floor
  Where Moab's daughter, homeless and forlorn,
  Found Boaz slumbering by his heaps of corn;
  And some remembered how the holy scribe,
  Skilled in the lore of every jealous tribe,
  Traced the warm blood of Jesse's royal son
  To that fair alien, bravely wooed and won.
  So fared they on to seek the promised sign
  That marked the anointed heir of David's line.

     At last, by forms of earthly semblance led,
  They found the crowded inn, the oxen's shed.
  No pomp was there, no glory shone around
  On the coarse straw that strewed the reeking ground;
  One dim retreat a flickering torch betrayed,—
  In that poor cell the Lord of Life was laid!

     The wondering shepherds told their breathless tale
  Of the bright choir that woke the sleeping vale;
  Told how the skies with sudden glory flamed;
  Told how the shining multitude proclaimed,
  "Joy, joy to earth! Behold the hallowed morn!
  In David's city Christ the Lord is born!
  'Glory to God!' let angels shout on high,—
  'Good-will to men!' the listening Earth reply!"

     They spoke with hurried words and accents wild;
  Calm in his cradle slept the heavenly child.
  No trembling word the mother's joy revealed,—
  One sigh of rapture, and her lips were sealed;
  Unmoved she saw the rustic train depart,
  But kept their words to ponder in her heart.

     Twelve years had passed; the boy was fair and tall,
  Growing in wisdom, finding grace with all.
  The maids of Nazareth, as they trooped to fill
  Their balanced urns beside the mountain-rill,—
  The gathered matrons, as they sat and spun,
  Spoke in soft words of Joseph's quiet son.
  No voice had reached the Galilean vale
  Of star-led kings or awe-struck shepherds' tale;
  In the meek, studious child they only saw
  The future Rabbi, learned in Israel's law.

     So grew the boy; and now the feast was near,
  When at the holy place the tribes appear.
  Scarce had the home-bred child of Nazareth seen
  Beyond the hills that girt the village-green,
  Save when at midnight, o'er the star-lit sands,
  Snatched from the steel of Herod's murdering bands,
  A babe, close-folded to his mother's breast,
  Through Edom's wilds he sought the sheltering West.

     Then Joseph spake: "Thy boy hath largely grown;
  Weave him fine raiment, fitting to be shown;
  Fair robes beseem the pilgrim, as the priest:
  Goes he not with us to the holy feast?"

     And Mary culled the flaxen fibres white;
  Till eve she spun; she spun till morning light;
  The thread was twined; its parting meshes through
  From hand to hand her restless shuttle flew,
  Till the full web was wound upon the beam,—
  Love's curious toil,—a vest without a seam!

     They reach the holy place, fulfil the days
  To solemn feasting given, and grateful praise.
  At last they turn, and far Moriah's height
  Melts in the southern sky and fades from sight.
  All day the dusky caravan has flowed
  In devious trails along the winding road
  (For many a step their homeward path attends,—
  And all the sons of Abraham are as friends).
  Evening has come,—the hour of rest and joy;—
  Hush! hush!—that whisper,—"Where is Mary's boy?"

     O weary hour! O aching days that passed
  Filled with strange fears, each wilder than the last:
  The soldier's lance,—the fierce centurion's sword,—
  The crushing wheels that whirl some Roman lord,—
  The midnight crypt that sucks the captive's breath,—
  The blistering sun on Hinnom's vale of death!

     Thrice on his cheek had rained the morning light,
  Thrice on his lips the mildewed kiss of night,
  Crouched by some porphyry column's shining plinth,
  Or stretched beneath the odorous terebinth.

     At last, in desperate mood, they sought once more
  The Temple's porches, searched in vain before;
  They found him seated with the ancient men,—
  The grim old rufflers of the tongue and pen,—
  Their bald heads glistening as they clustered near,
  Their gray beards slanting as they turned to hear,
  Lost in half-envious wonder and surprise
  That lips so fresh should utter words so wise.

     And Mary said,—as one who, tried too long,
  Tells all her grief and half her sense of wrong,—
  "What is this thoughtless thing which thou hast done?
  Lo, we have sought thee sorrowing, O my son!"

     Few words he spake, and scarce of filial tone,—
  Strange words, their sense a mystery yet unknown;
  Then turned with them and left the holy hill,
  To all their mild commands obedient still.

     The tale was told to Nazareth's sober men,
  And Nazareth's matrons told it oft again;
  The maids re-told it at the fountain's side;
  The youthful shepherds doubted or denied;
  It passed around among the listening friends,
  With all that fancy adds and fiction lends,
  Till newer marvels dimmed the young renown
  Of Joseph's son, who talked the Rabbis down.

     But Mary, faithful to its lightest word,
  Kept in her heart the sayings she had heard,
  Till the dread morning rent the Temple's veil,
  And shuddering Earth confirmed the wondrous tale.

  Youth fades; love droops; the leaves of friendship fall:
  A mother's secret hope outlives them all.